Fuji X-T2 - Fall Color

I am lucky enough to work within a stones throw of Regents Park in London, UK. I work on the 7th floor and have views of the park from my desk. The Park has become so commonplace in my day that I pretty much forgot that it was there and it was only by accident that I ended up walking through one lunch time and realised that fall (Autumn) has arrived.

I thought I'd take the Fuji X-T2 into the park this week to capture some fall color

Early Morning Fall Color - Regents Park, London

Early in the morning (around 8:00am in this case) Regent's Park is pretty quiet with only the occasional jogger or commuter passing through. The weather was bright but cloudy which works well for saturated fall color.

Circular Polariser

A circular polariser can be helpful to add saturation to fall leaves. I used a B+W 67mm Polarizer on a Fuji 18-135mm lens for the shots on this page.

The usual trick to judge the amount of Polarisation that you are introducing is to point the camera at clear blue sky (ideally around 90 degrees to the sun) twisting the polariser will cause the blue sky to deepen dramatically. I didn't have the option of a blue sky but focusing in on some foliage allows fine tuning of the effect. The polariser cuts out reflected light and takes any glare off of the leaves making them appear more saturated.

 

Lightroom Editing

Adobe Lightroom TAT tool for Hue

I shot the Regent's Park Photos in camera RAW rather than JPG which allows for more flexibility in post production. I use Adobe Lightroom and in the case of the image shown I made the following edits to bring some impact to the shot.

I boosted the vibrance slider by around 18. I find vibrance works well as an 'intelligent' saturation option as it only boosts color that needs it rather than the saturation slider that increases or decreases color saturation across the board.

 

I used the HSL Hue, Saturation and Luminance sliders by enabling the Targeted Adjustment Tool (TAT)  which allows you to click directly on the tone that you want to effect. In this case I adjusted the hue of the leaves slightly more orange.

Here is the image above compared to the RAW image straight from camera

Fuji X-T2 RAW file pre and post editing comparison

The X-T2 did a great job of capturing the Landscape scene. I used the tilting rear screen to allow comfortable composition with the camera close to the leaves on the ground which saves me lying on the floor and picking up some un-wanted camouflage 

Switching to AF-C with Tracking Mode enabled I was able to capture a snap of to a local squirrel as it rummaged through the fallen leaves.

Grey Squirrel in Regent's Park, London - Fuji X-T2

Fujifilm JPG - Fuji Velvia

Later in the week I shot some photographs in RAW+F mode which takes both a RAW and JPG file at the same time. In this case I utilised the Fuji Velvia Film Simulation and a White Balance of 'Cloudy' to capture the scene in my local park.

Nonsuch Park Early Morning - Fujifilm Fuji Velvia Film Simulation

I have saved out a 100% crop from the out of camera JPG for reference. The Fuji has done a good job of capturing detail in the leaves. The movement is caused by a light breeze and a fairly long shutter speed caused partly by the low light levels and partly by the B+W circular Polarizer that I was using to add saturation to the foliage.

100% crop of the Fuji X-T2 JPG file - Fuji Velvia Film Simulation with 'Cloudy' Color balance

 

Regents Park Gallery

I've shared a handful of photographs from the mornings photo shot. All images were taken on the Fuji X-T2 handheld with the Fuji 18-135mm Lens and shot in RAW mode. I am really pleased with the latitude for post production editing that the Fuji X-T2 allows.